Do Your Weight-loss Numbers Tell the Whole Story?

When it comes to weight management, many people think only about their actual weight, believing this to be the most important indicator in determining if their diet program has been successful. In fact, an increase or decrease in weight might not simply represent a gain or loss of fat; there could be many reasons behind a person’s weight changing. Total body weight encompasses everything from the weight of bone and muscle to fats, organs, skin and other body parts; and we should also remember that a high percentage of our body weight comes from water.

Body Water PercentageBody Water Percentage
This refers to the water content that is contained in body tissue. Muscle consists of about 70% water and there is a close relationship between body water percentage and muscle mass. If you only focus on reducing your body water percentage when slimming, you may find a corresponding increase in your body fat rate. Healthy weight management should focus on reducing fat consumption instead of reducing the body’s water content.

Body Fat Percentage
This refers to the fat content of body tissue. The body fat percentage is a more accurate way of estimating your body fat than taking a BMI reading. Having a heavy body weight does not necessarily mean you are too fat, but a high body fat percentage is a clear indication that you are overweight.

Basel Metabolic Rate (BMR)
The BMR refers to the minimum amount of calories your body burns by performing basic functions to sustain life, such as breathing and digestion when resting. BMR generally decreases with age, and also with a decrease in weight, while increasing the body’s muscle has the effect of increasing your BMR.

Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE)
Your TDEE – total daily energy expenditure – represents the total energy that you use in a single day.

A person’s physical activity can be divided into three levels:

Level 1

Inactive lifestyle (you sit down most of the day and take little or no exercise)

Level 2

Moderately active lifestyle (you sit most of the day, but take occasional low-intensity exercise)

Level 3

Very active lifestyle
(you are involved in intense aerobic exercise for more than 10 hours per week and/or your job requires heavy physical labor)

TDEE = BMR x Activity Level
Source: World Health Organization

Increase muscle:

Consume more calories per day than your TDEE. Consuming protein or amino acids after weight training will help to promote muscle-building.

Reduce fat:Consume less calories per day than your TDEE. Consuming a low-energy meal replacement instead of a full meal is recommended.
Increase muscle:

Consume more calories per day than your TDEE. Consuming protein or amino acids after weight training will help to promote muscle-building.

Reduce fat:Consume less calories per day than your TDEE. Consuming a low-energy meal replacement instead of a full meal is recommended.

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